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20121222
20121230
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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
a good science fiction story. and this year, the gop gave us plenty of fantasy. our next award is the ray bradbury for lead performance in a science fiction role. it's one of miff favorites. watch this. >> by the end of my second term, we will have the first permanent base on the moon and it will be american. >> first of all, if it's a legitimate rape, the fe plael body has ways to shut that whole thing double. >> the dangers of carbon dioxide. tell that to a plant how dangerous carbon dioxide is. >> all the candidates are so deserving. but the revvie can only go to one pirn and it's to newt gingrich. congr congratulatio congratulations, newt. we'll be right back. >> the revvies will return with president obama, clint eastwood, carl rove, plus the award for pli political performer of the year. [ thunder crashes ] [ male announcer ] if you think all batteries are the same... consider this: when the unexpected happens, there's one brand of battery more emergency workers trust in their maglites: duracell. one reason: duralock power preserve. it locks in power for up to 10 years in storage. g
cuts should be extended and for whom. taxation is not an economic science. it definitely -- if you gather 10 people in a room, you're going to get 10 different opinions and the views on taxing -- on the merits and philosophy of taxing individual asks the rich will vary. but, you know, this sort of immediate problem is not necessarily the larger philosophical question. it really is the more practical question of what is our tax system going to look like. host: and we've got this lead editorial from this morning's "wall street journal." real housewife offense the beltway. they write -- host: back to the phones. don in oklahoma city on our line for democrats. go ahead, don. caller: good morning. i have a couple of quick comments i would like to make. the first is that i find it ironic for so many years in recent history republicans have claimed to own patriotism yet they don't seem to want to vacate their fair share. host: joseph rosenberg. guest: you know, i mean, i'm not sure, you know, i'm not sure this is about pay. -- patriotism or anything like that. you know, the question of wh
the way, he developed a literary curiosity that pivots from dystopian visions of science fiction to the 19th century classic novel, "moby dick." in captain ahab's whaling crew, men of every race are thrown together in pursuit of the elusive and the mythical. diaz sees in this a parable of america then and now. he teaches creative writing at m.i.t. and recently received a prestigious macarthur fellowship, the well-known and coveted "genius grant." junot diaz, welcome. >> oh, thank you for having me. >> well, i've wanted to have you, because i've wanted to ask one of america's foremost storytellers, "what's the story you're telling yourself out of this election?" >> whew, it was bananas watching that election. but i think probably the thing that comes out most forcefully after the election is how little people were expecting the voting, the sort of, the electoral body that made obama's victory possible. i mean, i think there was -- no one was talking about the sort of numbers that showed up for obama. no one was predicting the diversity of the vote. no one was predicting that sort of the rep
first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. the red cross was down here all the time. [ man ] they've given us a lot of heart. in times of need, they're there. ♪ [ kerry ] my dad was watching his house burn. he turned around, and all of a sudden, there was this guy standing there from the red cross. at a point where i had just lost everything, the idea that there was someone there... that's an amazing thing. ♪ temerity, temer . >>> the rising political star of 2013, chris hayes, who will that be? >> massachusetts senator elizabeth warren, i think it is not an easy thing to do what she did. you know, she was a star on this network and among progressives, but to go on particularly in massachusetts, i think she will be absolutely a force in massachusetts. >> it pains me to say it, but this is going to be the year when corey booker, he is either going to run for governor -- >> krystal, the rising star. >> the youngest woman in the house, also the first hindu-american woman in congress, combat veteran, really an amazing woman.
. you say that this is unsound science and potentially could lead to problems. why do you believe that there is not a value in at least looking at this gunman's dna? >> well, first of all, let me say that my heart goes out to all the people in newtown, connecticut. this was an horrific series of events. second of all, the major problem that i have as a geneticist is that it's impossible to gain much information with the sample size of one. so what you are looking at is one person's dna, and you're trying to say that it's different than other people. but you only have a sample size of one. >> would it be helpful, do you think, to look at the dna of other shooters of those from previous mass shootings? >> well, again, the problem is, we have probably less than five or even ten people that we're talking about. when studies -- accurate genetic studies are done on a whole population, we look for hundreds of different people, and you have to show a strong correlation with that. and the second problem would be what are we trying to look for? i mean, we're going -- the whole idea is you'r
the epa. inhof of the science committee issued a report back in october where he said the obama administration not just the epa but several agencies are working to find way to regulate the hydraulic fracturing at the federal level to stop the practice altogether. irony is fracking is one thing in the environmental -- excuse me, manufacturing sector that lifted up the economy. to the point it's not talked about exporting liquid natural gas. >> hypocrisy of the idealogue on the left. in the past coal was a big offender. they wanted to kill coal, which the epa has done. natural gas is wond evidenceful because it emit that was carbon. now coal is abolished we don't have new plans and now they are going after the natural gas. supposed to be benign. if you say it's a pendulum, it's not. ratchet. it expands. republicans can shrink it in the future you be in the end, it's inforrable and it grows. >> thank you. stay tuned for president's >>
, should we think more about it. should we think more about the science about it. they are saying that we should spin off more great technology. it's another great competition. >> i love the change in mr. webb a year later. the president is basically asking, is this a top priority. and he said oh, absolutely. [laughter] >> i think he also asks how else it can be done. is there a way of doing this. perhaps this shifts from kennedy's own cold war. >> part of what i want to understand, if this meeting is taking place about a year and a half after the state of the union speech, here it is a year and a half later, and the government isn't really on board. and you think, my god. >> i can confirm that that is often the case. but the written document i've seen on display in this library, why is it being done right now? what we do in the next 24 hours. he really was on it. but i think it's worth pointing out that in 1963, which it was a very different year from 1962. but the cold war had calm down a big notch after the cuban missile crisis. and khrushchev and kennedy were working closely together
display at the smithsonian in d.c. and the california science center in los angeles. >>> also another story we want to bring you out of florida. just check this out. unwelcome visitor at a picnic area in the everglades. look at that. family on vacation from arkansas took this video after a 17-foot burmese python was shot and killed by park rangers. the giant snakes, many of them former pets, have become a big, big, big nuisance in south florida. next month florida game officials will hold a hunting contest offering a $15,000 prize to the person who kills the most pythons. >>> all right, let's turn from snakes to flakes. the massive storm that's been causing huge problems since christmas day is finally over. maine was the last to deal with it. some places got a foot of fresh snow, but it's not over yet. meteorologist chad myers is in the cnn weather center with a look at that. so chad, you know, i thought when this storm came through, all right, fine. it wasn't so great. lots of snow. >> right. >> but it's over. not over yet. >> no, not over yet. and another one coming on its heels. an
things, like what the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. ♪ oh beautiful for spacious skies for amber waves of grain ♪ ♪ for purple mountains majesty ♪ above the fruited plain ♪ america america god shed his grace on thee ♪ ♪ and crown thy good >> our gaggle here was almost unanimous in naming that ad as one of the most memorable and effective ads of the 2012 campaign. that's saying something in a race where nearly a billion dollars was spent on advertising alone in the presidential race. it's tough to stand out. we're all back, what was interesting here, kevin and stephanie, is both of you picked that ad as the most effective and both of you on the democratic side, and you both picked the most effective ad on the republican side. here it is. >> he tried, you tried. it's okay to make a change. >> so, i thought that was interesting. it's almost like you're respecting the other's work. kevin, you picked the america the beautiful. what -- >> i remember when that ad came out, it was previ
aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪ let's stay together >>> when you look at this picture, what do you think? at what point was it taken? >> i think we were campaigning in iowa. >> so why were you hugging her so hard in iowa? >> because i love my wife. >> and also, i hadn't seen him in a while. when you're campaigning, we're two ships passing in the night. and the first time i saw him was when i walked on stage to greet him. and that's my honey giving me a hug. >> how do you keep the fire going? >> that's a good question. >> you know, we've been married now 20 years. >> mm-hmm. >> like every marriage, i think, you know, you have your ups and you have your downs. but if you work through the tough times, the respect and love that you feel deepens. >> and then there's a lot of laughter, you know. >> and you're funnier. >> yeah. for the most part. >> everybody thinks he's pretty funny. i'm funnier than people think. >> you are. >> that may be. you may be funnier than people think. >> barbara walters in th
. this summer, he showed us the science behind every shape, size, and shade of these pixels. >> you now have your camouflage. so we're trying to trick the brainseeing things that aren't actually there. >> reporter: digital shapes creates depth and shadows where none exist. that's today's design. >> what's coming up down the road and very quickly is the harry potter cloak. >> what is that? >> reporter: with that fictional cloak, harry isn't just camouflaged, he's invisible. >> my body's gone! >> how invisible are we talking here? if i walked into a room with a soldier wearing one of these cloaks -- >> you wouldn't see him at all. he would be completely invisible to you. >> reporter: this isn't make-believe. the military has seen this so-called quantum stealth technology. it works by bending the light around an object, even concealing most of a person's shadow. imagine what that could do for a sniper, hiding in a field, or the american pilots who ejected over libya when their fighter jets crashed last year. >> they could actually pull out, very similar to what they carry with a survival blanke
got his ba in political science from the university of florida and m.a. and phd from the university of michigan. so he speaks for the heartland of our great country. >> the automobile industry. last night and he was stopping production of vx. the electors frequently, as solid and no satisfactory radio and television shows onto human kind. even norm has competed for the misquotations in any given year and multimedia. norm is a resident scholar at the american enterprise institute for public policy research. he writes a column for roll call. he's written for every publication on the face of the earth. he and tom both have been on the news hour with jim lehrer, and "nightline" charlie rose. he has another heart and are coming ba, magna laude from university of minnesota and a phd from university of michigan, which is where you guys met. i just have to say that one of the reasons why i think tom and warm is so much attention the outlook piece is because they have been spending their entire lives being so moderate and reasonable that would make it not, there really must be something wron
chair, had a governmental studies program, got his ba in political science from university of florida in this animated phd from the university of michigan. so he speaks for the heartland of our great country. >> any cd automobile industry. [laughter] >> and was opposed by stopping production of the units sold. the electors are solid in all and is on every show known to humankind. they've often competed for the most quotations in any given year than all of our media. norm is a resident scholar at the representative for public policy research. the election analyst for cbs and has written for every publication on the face of the earth dirty and tom both have been on the news hour with jim lehrer, "nightline," charlie rose. he has another heartland are, ba university of minnesota phd from the university of michigan, which is where you guys met. i just have to say that one of the reasons why i think that tom and norm for so much attention is because they have been spending their entire lives being so moderate and reasonable that when they get mad, they really must be something wrong. so wh
is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> good morning. i'm victor blackwell in for carol costello. stories we're watching in "the newsroom" the opening bell at the new york stock exchange rang just a few seconds ago. stocks are poised to open with lower, open lower rather with much of their attention still focused on that fiscal cliff. ringing the opening bell today the startup weekend leadership team. >>> tributes are pouring in this morning for retired general norman schwarzkopf, stormin' norman as he was known died yesterday. he became a household name in the '90s as he led america to victory as commander of coalition forces during the first gulf war. schwarzkopf was 78. >>> craft store giant hobby lobby is bracing for a $1.3 million a day fine. it starts january 1st for bucking some of the rules in the affordable health care law. you see the company opposes providing some contraceptives to its employees tough its company health care plan citing religious grounds. the company says some contraceptive pro
science director at north carolina. he received his ph.d. from the university of california san diego. he was part of a team of analysts who correctly predicted the outcome of the popular vote to in this year's presidential election between mitt romney and president obama. today he will give us an overview of the events and values that shaped the 2012 election, while giving us an inside look at the challenges and choices, public opinion it researchers face and pre- election polls. please join me in welcoming him to the taubman center. [applause] >> thank you. it is always a pleasure. always a fun time to talk about what we find in the polls, and the polling process after an election. this is a time where us in the business think a lot about what is going on and how effective pulled far at capturing public feelings. certainly we all have our feelings crossed -- fingers crossed going into election be e outcome. i thought i would start by talking about the election and what i thought the challenges were that they would face and how it played out over the course of that from our perspective,
on polling science them raw emotion from a campaign during battle. there was a sense among republicans that chris christie had stabbed him in the back. what's interesting about these candidates to do the crossover move is they tend to alienate the base and they tend to lose their effectiveness of a party that they cross over to. in recent days, talking to people in the senate you actually feel that his support for the $60 billion request for 70 relief is hurting them with republicans. things move on rather quickly in politics. host: there are lingering peelings that he did not do what romney expected with the keynote address. he said he said that today and a half before and they did not change anything. guest: there's a lot of grumbling when it comes to chris christie. a lot of them felt he cared more about himself than governor romney. he was not a staff favorite, to put it mildly. when the grumbling that took place after the hurricane, he said he understood because he has been a governor and he needs to concentrate on his staff. a lot of them more deeply angry about his embrace. pres
's our representative of the disinvestment of humanity, arts in favor of commerce, science, technolog y. but what you just said and the context within need for the untold stories is indicative of the historical literacy that's black history is the subject that is most of known or erased from our collective consciousness. is that where literacy contributes to our future? the larger story is essential to your vision of the country we ought to live then. >> guest: i don't know. i thought about how reflective her family was of the american story. i wanted to to imbue with a history so people could see her family had front-row seats to the most important moments. slavery, a civil war, and emancipation, migration, jim crow, a depression, and all the steps forward and back were reflected of who we are. >> host: did you think of it as a smaller project? not to put it in context the individuals of the family tree but it became a social history of rural and urban urban, a southern and northern sweeping, intimate. did that scale have been as a result of their research with pen to paper and fought
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)

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